poetry & tsismis: emily's blog

October 2, 2012

DAY 2 of Filipino American History Month: Read a Good Book – Tomorrow’s Memories: A Diary, 1924-1928

It’s Day 2 of Filipino American History Month and I’m going to try to drop some knowledge more regularly on this blog, at least during October.

Since I am a professor/lecturer and poet, folks often ask me what books they should read to learn more about Filipino American history. Short of handing them a syllabus (or the reading list that IS actually printed in the back of my first book), I often tell them some basic standard texts, that anyone of any age could read and appreciate: Filipinos: Forgotten Asian Americans by Fred Cordova, America Is In The Heart by Carlos Bulosan, Philip Vera Cruz: A History of Filipino Immigrants and the Farmworkers Movement by Craig Scharlin and Lilia Villanueva, The Filipino Americans by Barbara Posadas, and the list goes on. If they’ve taken any kind of Asian American Studies class or even just read my posts on this blog, they might have heard of those books or read them already. Then I like to pull out one of my favorite books, Tomorrow’s Memories: A Diary, 1924-1928, by Angeles Monrayo Raymundo (University of Hawai’i Press, 2003).

I am proud to have helped and relentlessly encouraged Angeles’ eldest daughter, Rizaline Raymundo, to publish the book. Riz had first typed excerpts of her mother’s handwritten diary and published them in the Filipino American National Historical Society Santa Clara Valley Chapter Journal in the early 1990s. When I first read the diary excerpts, I knew that students and countless others would appreciate the rarity of having history told from a young, female perspective. Now you can too:

Tomorrow’s Memories: A Diary, 1924-1928

by Angeles Monrayo

Edited by Rizaline R. Raymundo, with historical essays by Jonathan Okamura and Dawn Mabalon (2003)

From the Publisher, University of Hawai’i Press:

http://www.uhpress.hawaii.edu/p-2788-9780824826710.aspx

“I would like to read about me–what everyday things happened to me–when I am an old woman. Right now I am only 11 years, 5 months.” ~Angeles Monrayo, 1924

“Angeles Monrayo (1912–2000) began her diary on January 10, 1924, a few months before she and her father and older brother moved from a sugar plantation in Waipahu to Pablo Manlapit’s strike camp in Honolulu. Here for the first time is a young Filipino girl’s view of life in Hawaii and central California in the first decades of the twentieth century—a significant and often turbulent period for immigrant and migrant labor in both settings. Angeles’ vivid, simple language takes us into the heart of an early Filipino family as its members come to terms with poverty and racism and struggle to build new lives in a new world. But even as Angeles recounts the hardships of immigrant life, her diary of “everyday things” never lets us forget that she and the people around her went to school and church, enjoyed music and dancing, told jokes, went to the movies, and fell in love. Essays by Jonathan Okamura and Dawn Mabalon enlarge on Angeles’ account of early working-class Filipinos and situate her experience in the larger history of Filipino migration to the United States.”

#fahm #fahm2012 #FilipinoAmericanHistoryMonth

I hope you add this to your reading list, if you haven’t read it already, then tell me what you think of it!

www.emilylawsin.com

For more on Fiipino American History Month, see: www.fanhs-national.org

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